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Covington Criminal Defense Law Blog

NFL player accused of committing a crime on Kentucky roadways

Many of our Kentucky readers are probably fans of the Cincinnati Bengals, due to the close proximity of that NFL market and the lack of a professional football team in our own state. For those who are, some will recognize the name Orson Charles - the Bengals' starting fullback. What our readers may not have known, however, is that Charles was recently arrested in Covington following a reported road rage incident and faces weapons charges.

According to reports, Charles was arrested on March 31 after someone called 911 and claimed that Charles had waved a gun at them. Charles was booked into the Madison County Detention Center and was released on a $5,000 bond shortly thereafter.

60 people sought on arrest warrants for alleged drug charges

Large scale police operations usually catch some serious news coverage, and a recent operation in Covington, Kentucky, certainly fit the bill. According to reports, a long-term investigation by undercover police officers resulted in the recent issuance of 60 arrest warrants for individuals in that area of Kentucky, and all of the individuals in question are wanted on drug charges.

While many areas of the country are dealing with an exploding methamphetamine problem, there are also many states, including Kentucky, that are started to see the resurgence of another drug that has been around for a long time: heroin. Like meth, heroin is highly addictive, but some experts believe that the revitalized interest in heroin is due to something else: abuse of prescription drugs.

Two Kentucky residents arrested for alleged drug offenses

Many of our Kentucky readers know that the methamphetamine problem in America is starting to get out of control. And, as a result, law enforcement agencies throughout the country are doing their best to crack down on this dangerous and potentially deadly drug. According to a recent report, those efforts hit home for two Kentucky residents on March 19.

The report indicated that the Kentucky State Police executed a search warrant at an apartment occupied by two individuals in Muhlenberg County. Upon entering the residence the troopers reportedly found methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. The two individuals present, a 23-year-old man and a 22-year-old woman, were both arrested and are now facing charges of drug trafficking and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Four Kentucky residents facing serious drug charges after search

Drug crimes are a serious problem throughout the country, and Kentucky is not immune to this issue. However, drug cases, among all of those involving criminal charges, are some of the most challenged types of cases because of the potential for the abuse of a person's constitutional rights, especially when it comes to search and seizure rights. When a police agency executes a search warrant, the potential for problems is very real.

According to a recent report, a search warrant was executed by a joint task force of several different law enforcement agencies in Elsmere on March 6. The reports indicate that the search resulted in the arrest of four people and the seizure of half a pound of heroin.

Four Kentucky residents facing serious drug charges after search

Drug crimes are a serious problem throughout the country, and Kentucky is not immune to this issue. However, situations of arrest with drug charges involved are some of the most challenged because of the potential for the abuse of a person's constitutional rights, especially search and seizure rights. When a police agency executes a search warrant, the potential for problems is very real.

According to a recent report, a search warrant was executed by a joint task force of several different law enforcement agencies in Elsmere on March 6. The reports indicate that the search resulted in the arrest of four people and the seizure of half a pound of heroin.

Girlfriend negates boyfriend's objection to warrantless search

Readers may know that a spouse may be able to represent the interests of another spouse in certain situations. But can a girlfriend or boyfriend be afforded the same powers to consent to a police search? Furthermore, what if a couple disagrees?

The U.S. Supreme Court was recently required to address this very situation. Police, investigating a robbery and responding to a tip, visited an apartment in the near vicinity. A woman answered the door, and her boyfriend also appeared in the doorway a few moments later. However, the woman had signs of a recent struggle, including a bump on her nose and blood on her shirt.

Kentucky man at the center of a drunk driving controversy

A recent drunk driving tragedy has made regional headlines because of the driver’s background.

Specifically, the Kentucky man already had a criminal conviction for driving under the influence. The conviction occurred in 2005 when the man was charged for a drunk driving accident that caused the death of a woman. He served a seven-year sentence for that DUI conviction.

Probation violations may result in additional criminal charges

Probation violations can carry serious consequences. Direct violations of the terms of probation might result in jail time. Yet even the cumulative effect of technical violations might also result in a revocation of probation.

In Kentucky, the website for the Kentucky Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole states that 429 sworn officers have supervisory probation duties over 38,754 offenders. Those duties include monitoring the payment of fees, as well as community service work programs to which a probationer may be assigned.

The prospect of a 0.05 alcohol limit continues to gains steam

The National Transportation Safety Board made a fairly significant announcement last year, stating that the blood alcohol content law in the United States should be lowered. Every state observes a 0.08 legal limit for blood alcohol content when driving; but the NTSB says that limit should be dropped to 0.05. There was a time in this country when the blood alcohol limit was 0.10, and there were even states that had limits of 0.15 in the 1980s.

While the intent of the NTSB's announcement is to improve road safety, the question remains how this will impact the criminal side of the law. Obviously there would be more DUI arrests (at least in the immediate aftermath of such a potential change, but possibly for an extended period too), but would the "quality" of the arrests (for lack of a better phrase) really be there?

Super Bowl Sunday could result in drunk driving charges

Super Bowl weekend has come and gone. While the celebrations might be over and some people might be embarrassed to tell which team they cheered for, some people's legal headaches might be just beginning.

Over the weekend, Kentucky law enforcement officials were out in full-force, trying to find drunk drivers and arrest them. However, just because a person has one beer at their friend's Super Bowl party, doesn't mean they are drunk. Because law enforcement officials are targeting people for drunk driving, they might be more inclined to arrest a person for drunk driving, even if the person just made a minor driving error.

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